Understanding DFS Point Scoring

2021-22 NFL Computer Predictions and Rankings Fantasy Football Strategy  understanding style scoring point color 011369  Introduction

Daily fantasy sports are much more action-packed than traditional fantasy sports. It happens across a much shorter timeframe too, but this can confuse how DFS games are scored. The Internet has created massive communities oriented around every sport and the fantasy playoffs in them. 

We’re focusing on fantasy football scoring here, the most popular form of fantasy sports that is played in America. You can see NFL daily fantasy sports in action online. Here we have information on how those fantasy games are commonly scored, along with pertinent definitions that beginners will want to know.

 

DFS Point Scoring

Here’s a rundown of how different events in a game are scored under generalized DFS rules. Remember that the specific rules may change depending on who you’re using to manage your fantasy sports games.

Rushing yards made = 0.1 points 0 points allowed = 10 points
Rushing touchdowns = 6 points 1-6 points allowed = 7 points
Passing yards made = 0.04 points 7-13 points allowed = 4 points
Passing touchdowns = 4 points 14-20 points allowed = 1 point
Receiving yards = 0.1 points 21-27 points allowed = 0 points
Receiving touchdowns = 6 points 28-34 points allowed = -1 point
Return touchdowns = 6 points 35+ points allowed = -4 points
Safeties = 2 points Field goals from 0-39 yards = 3 points
Sacks = 1 point Field goals from 40-49 yards = 4 points
Interceptions = -1 point Field goals from 50+ yards = 5 points
Interceptions made = 2 points
Receptions = 0.5 points
Blocked punt/kick = 2 points
Fumbles lost = -2 points
Fumbles recovered after touchdowns = 6 points
Opponent fumbles recovered = 2 points
Kickoff return touchdowns = 6 points
Punt return touchdowns = 6 points
Two-point conversion passes = 2 points
Two-point conversions scored = 2 points
Extra-point conversions = 1 point
Extra point return = 2 points

 

Important Definitions

To properly understand daily fantasy sports, you should know some important definitions that enable you to figure out what’s going on. Here are several:

$/Point: The salary of players, divided by how many fantasy points they score.

50/50: Where half the field is paid evenly, usually double the entrance fee.

Algorithm/Model/Projection: Terms for the equations used to calculate players’ statistical performances in a game.

Balance: A lineup that’s filled with mid-price range players.

Bankroll: The money you use when betting or playing fantasy sports.

Ceiling: The max points expected from a player based on past performances.

Chalk: A player/team/game expected to be popular with the crowd.

Dart Throw: A longshot play that relies on a player reaching a higher target score. 

Double-Up: Contests where your entry fee is doubled if you’re in the top 50%.

Fish: A new (and inexperienced) DFS player.

Field Size: The number of people in a contest.

Floor: Opposite of ceiling, the lowest points expected from a player based on past performances.

Guaranteed Prize Pool: Tournaments with a guaranteed minimum prize pool.

High Stakes: Contests with a higher entry fee, typically $50.

Head-To-Head: A contest between two DFS players, one on one.

Late Swap: When you can switch players in and out after the first game has begun.

Lean: A preference towards one position over others, e.g., you lean X player over Y player.

Min Salary: The minimum amount a player costs on the site.

Mass Multi-Entry: A.K.An MME, where DFS players enter lineups into a contest until they hit the maximum limit.

Multi-Entry: Where one enters more than one lineup into a contest.

Overlay: When a tournament pays out more money than they receive.

Pay Up: To choose high-price players instead of mid or lower ones.

Player Prop Bet: Oddsmaker lines that focus on one player and their performance.

Punt: Lower-priced players that could be successful but are also disposable.

Quintuple Up: Where the contest payout is five times the entry fee.

Reach: A chosen player/play expected to make an unexpectedly good performance.

ROI: Return On Investment, how much money you make on your initial investment.

Sharks: Experienced DFS players who know what they’re doing.

Single-Entry: Contests with one entry limit.

Sleeper: Players being overlooked who could make a good play.

Stacking: Choosing multiple players from the same teams/games.

Tilt: Disappointment/frustration felt by bettors and DFS players whose positions don’t pay off.

Tournament: Competition between many players. In DFS, tournaments don’t usually have tiers like they traditionally do.

Train: When a DFS player enters the same lineup multiple times into multi-entry games.

Triple-Up: Tournaments that payout three times the entry fee to each winner, similar to double-ups and quintuple-ups.

Upside: The expectation that a player will exceed the projections given by oddsmakers/DFS hosts.

Value: Players that should be priced higher than they are due to certain opportunities.

Viable: When a player has a reasonable expectation of reaching their target score.

 

SIMPLE: How to Use Regression Analysis to Help Predict NFL Scoring

This video is rather basic – but should give you some idea how a simple statistical method, “regression”, can be applied to predict NFL outcome.