FF-Winners.Com Reveals 3 Amazing Fantasy Bargain Sleepers for 2016-7

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DeSean Jackson, WR, Washington Redskins — Jackson is going absurdly low in many fantasy football drafts — being taken outside the top 30 wide receivers in most leagues — mostly on account of misconceptions of his durability, production, and attitude (almost all of which are totally false). Yes, Jackson missed six games last season with a troublesome hamstring injury, but he was totally healthy from November onwards last year, playing in nine of the Redskins last 10 games of the season, including the postseason (he was held out of a meaningless game in Week 17 against Dallas). Prior to 2015, he played in 31 of 32 games over his last two seasons. In the eight regular season games that Jackson did play in last season, he recorded 30 catches for 528 yards and four touchdowns; project that over the course of a 16 game season, and that’s over 1,000 yards receiving and eight touchdowns. In 2014, Jackson had 1,169 yards and six receiving touchdowns with the Redskins revolving door at quarterback; so, the questions about his level of productivity are totally baseless. Finally, Jackson might’ve griped his way out of Philadelphia, but he’s been a great teammate in Washington. He’s looked the best he has in training camps, so far, as a member of the Redskins, and he spent the entire offseason working hard at the team facility. Jackson could be in line for a pretty big season in 2016, perhaps in line with the numbers we used to see him put up in Philadelphia during his prime.

Vincent Jackson, WR, Tampa Bay Buccaneers — Similarly, another wide receiver named “Jackson” is falling to absurdly low depths in most fantasy drafts — often being taken outside of the top 45 wide receivers — because of injuries curtailing his production in 2015. Vincent Jackson put up only 33 receptions, 543 yards, and three touchdowns in 10 games last year. But, he’s come into training camp determined for a bounce-back season. Last year was the first time since 2010 when Jackson missed a single game due to injury; prior to 2015, Jackson hadn’t missed a game in four years. As a member of the Buccaneers, he was ranked among the top 15 wide receivers in the NFL each year (including 2014, in Mike Evans’ rookie season). In his first five healthy games of last season, he still had 21 catches for 306 yards and two touchdowns (extrapolated over a full season, that would be 67 receptions for 979 yards and six touchdowns). With another year of experience for Jameis Winston, and teams increasingly keying on Evans, Jackson could be in for a nice rebound season, and should be a solid WR3 for most teams.

Theo Riddck, RB, Detroit Lions — Riddick should be on the radar for everyone playing in a PPR or half-PPR this season. Entering 2015 as mostly an afterthought, Riddick finished 19th among running backs in standard PPR scoring leagues, putting him firmly in the RB2 mix. He actually led the league in receptions among running backs (80 catches), was the second most targeted running back (99 targets), had the second most receiving yards among running backs (697 yards), and tied for seventh in receiving touchdowns. Riddick is often around the 40th running back taken in PPR/half-PPR leagues, making him a total bargain for players who are savvy enough to grab him in the middle-to-late rounds of the draft.

[Analysis by NFL expert Rajan Nanavati]

FF-Winners.Com Reveals Sleeper Team of the Year 2016

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One of the most under-the-radar storylines in the NFL is the way that Chicago Bears General Manager Ryan Pace has gone about renovating this roster over the last two years. They’re one of the rare teams who has set out to build a team the “right” way — building the foundation of the team through the draft, and then supplementing those building blocks with smart free agent acquisitions — and has actually stuck to the plan (at least so far).

Pace has absolutely aced his last two drafts. The Bears had one of my favorite overall crops in 2015 — they could have as many as five starters from that group: wide receiver Kevin White, defensive tackle Eddie Goldman, center Hroniss Grasu, running back Jeremy Langford, and safety Adrian Amos — and they followed that up by putting together one hell of a class this year. I’m admittedly getting a little “Vernon Gholston déjà vu” when it comes to their first round pick Leonard Floyd — people falling in love with the physical tools more than his actual football skills — but the raw tools are certainly there. The rest of the class, though, is absolutely money.

Offensive lineman Cody Whitehair (out of Kansas State) and defensive lineman Jonathan Bullard (out of the University of Florida), taken in the late second and early third rounds, will contribute right away. Linebacker Nick Kwiatkoski (4th round pick out of West Virginia University) is an undersized but athletic and rangy; at the least, he’ll provide great depth and standout special teams play. Running back Jordan Howard (5th round pick out of Indiana) is a “thunder” running back with serious pop, and could provide a really nice tag team partner to Jeremy Langford. Defensive back Deandre Houston-Carson (6th round out of William & Mary) is a small school gem that could’ve gone a couple of rounds higher. And finally, wide receiver Daniel Braverman (7th round pick out of Western Michigan) is a feisty Julian Edelman-type receiver who was crazy productive in college.

In the 2016 free agency period, the Bears might’ve made three of the shrewdest and most strategic free agent signings out of anyone. They shored shore up the middle of their defense by (very quietly) signing two of the better inside linebackers in football: Danny Trevathan (formerly of Denver) and Jerrell Freeman (formerly of Indianapolis) That just adds to a group of linebackers that already had Pernell McPhee (a fantastic free agent pickup from Baltimore last season), Lamarr Houston, and the aforementioned Floyd. Then, they signed right tackle Bobby Massie (formerly of Arizona), allowing Kyle Long to move back inside to guard, where he’s a Pro Bowl-caliber player; that one signing effectively shored them up in two positions. So, the Bears’ offensive line and the middle linebackers — two of their weaker position groups last season — could very well end up being two of their strengths.

We think they still have a few big questions that need to be answered, like whether new offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains — who was promoted from quarterbacks coach — can carry on the offense that Adam Gase so masterfully ran for Chicago last season; who is going to emerge from their logjam at running back (between Jeremy Langford, Ka’Deem Carey, and rookie Jordan Howard have their strengths, but none of those guys are anything close to what Matt Forte was last season); and if their secondary can hold up (Kyle Fuller had an up-and-down year last year, and they’ve basically got nothing at cornerback behind him, nor at safety next to Amos).

Still, if things break correctly for them, this team has the potential to be dangerous. And if they continue to build this team the way they have been over the last couple of years, We think they’re a really good running back and one starting cornerback away from being a legitimate contender in the NFC.

[Analysis by NFL expert Rajan Nanavati]

FF-Winners.com’s Three Quarterbacks to Avoid in 2016-7

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Derek Carr, Oakland Raiders — Through the first eight games of last season, Derek Carr looked like a superstar-in-the-making, throwing for 2,094 yards, 19 touchdowns, and four interceptions. Then, in the second half of the season, his stats dropped to  1893 yards, 13 touchdowns, and nine interceptions. So, the simple question is: if you draft Derek Carr next season, which version of him are you getting? With all the free agent moves the Raiders made in the offseason, there’s going to be a lot pressure on them. Teams definitely won’t overlook them, the way they might’ve in 2015. Plus, given the fact that the Raiders don’t exactly have a dynamic running game, there’s going to be even more pressure on Carr to put the offense on his shoulders. How will he respond to that pressure, considering he’s only in his third NFL season? We’re not necessarily saying you should outright “avoid” Derek Carr,  because there is a lot of upside (especially in leagues with any keeper options). But we’d be a little reluctant to bank on him as a sure-fire QB1, as he was for stretches of last season, and as many envision him being this season.

Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons — A few years ago, Matt Ryan seemed almost destined to break into the echelon of the NFL’s elite quarterbacks. But over the last three years, he’s only gone 18-30 as a starter, and his TD-to-INT ratio has dropped from 2.1 to 1.6. In 2015, he only threw for 21 touchdown passes, which was the 2nd lowest total of his career. Conversely, he also threw 16 interceptions (the second highest interception total of his career), four of which came in the red zone (the 2nd highest number in the NFL of such stat, only behind Eli Manning). Oh, and should we also mention his career-high 12 fumbles? At points last season, there were whispers of a near-mutiny by the Falcons offensive player, against Kyle Shanahan’s offensive schemes. Shanahan’s offense very much predicated on play-action passes, which isn’t something that Matt Ryan has shown a great proficiency with. Another season with bumps and hiccups in this offensive scheme won’t be good for business. At the point in the draft where you’d think about taking Matt Ryan, w’d be much more comfortable with guys like Matt Stafford (who could have a really nice season under offensive coordinator Jim Bob Cooter), Ryan Tannehill (who could have a big bounce-back season working under Adam Gase), or even Jameis Winston (who’s come into training camp in fantastic shape, and looking to improve on a very promising rookie season).

Brock Osweiler, Denver Broncos — Brock Osweiler is currently ranked anywhere between the #20 and #25 quarterback in fantasy next season, so it’s not like people aren’t already avoiding him. But, for those of you who think that Osweiler might be “Matt Schaub 2.0” for the Texans, we wouldn’t hold your breath. In an offense in Denver that had more depth than the one he’ll be playing with in Houston, he threw for 1,967 yards passing, 10 touchdowns, and six interceptions; extrapolate that over a full season, and you’re looking at less than 4,000 yards passing and about 20 touchdowns. Neither of those are titillating numbers. Again, we realize that he’s only in the backup/QB2 discussion for nearly everyone, but even as a backup, we think you’re better off letting someone like Jay Cutler or even Ryan Fitzpatrick fall into your lap.

[Analysis by NFL expert Rajan Nanavati]

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