Winning Fantasy Football Strategy

(from sporting news.com:)

Basics (If you’ve played for a few years, feel free to skip this section)

1. Knowledge is power. You HAVE to know your league’s settings. This is non-negotiable. Know what positions are required (2 QBs? 3 flex? No flex?), know how the scoring is broken down,  know if bonus points are awarded, etc. You can throw a wrench into your season from the very beginning by not understanding your league’s settings.

2. Do your research. You don’t need to know who has what assignment on an A-gap overload zone blitz (is that even a real thing?), but it’s important to know who the starting running back and receivers are for the Jaguars, who some of the backups are in Dallas and Philadelphia, and so on.

3. Personal touch. Make your own rankings. Yahoo!, ESPN, CBS, etc. are all going to have their own set of rankings, but yours may look a lot different — especially when you move beyond the top 30-40 or so. Your rankings will reflect your research and your strategy and will help you have an easier time during the draft.

4. Patience is a virtueDon’t be the person who jumps on a kicker or defense a round or three too early. Not only will you announce yourself as fresh meat, but you could significantly lower your team’s ceiling.

5. Fantasy football “fitbit”. Everyone wants to get his and her steps these days. Use that same mentality in fantasy football. Be active on the wire, consume information, start players who are actually starting on game day. You’ll be surprised what simply being an active owner can do for you even if you had a lackluster draft.

Advanced

1. Pitch selection. One of the most basic things you’ll hear someone say regarding draft strategy is “get as much value as possible”. That’s certainly true, but “value” is such a fluid concept in a draft. At any point, the best value may be that boring, steady vet with the established ceiling and high floor. Sometimes it’s the flashy young player with high risk but an even higher ceiling. The key is knowing when to simply move the chains and when to toss the Hail Mary. Whatever you do, try to avoid “throwaway picks”. That’s not the official term, but you know it when you see it. “Oh, it’s the 12th round, Trent Richardson and his 3.3 yards per carry will come in handy at some point, right?” No! Even late in the draft, you want to avoid wasting picks on players that you know won’t give you anything. If you’re going to take a zero anyway, you might as well swing for the fences.

2. “Last man standing”. In this day of specialization and committees, it can be difficult to sort through backfield pecking orders. It’s one thing if you know that Player A is going to handle early-down work and give way in passing situations or if Player B is a goal-line specialist, but how do you handle a situation like Cleveland or Dallas where multiple backs with similar skillsets are going to be battling for carries? Instead of guessing, just wait and pluck the second or third guy in the competition. Not only are you getting him at a cheaper price, but chances are solid that you’ll end up with the top option. You can also avoid these murky situations altogether, but it’s getting increasingly more difficult to build a team without dipping into these muddled competitions.

3. Stacking. While you shouldn’t necessarily set out to draft excess depth at a position or a number of players with the same bye, you shouldn’t be afraid to build on it if that’s how your draft has unfolded. Quality depth is never a bad thing, and you can usually trade from a surplus. As far as byes are concerned, I’ll reiterate that you shouldn’t go out of your way to have all of your players on one bye week, but sacrificing one automatic loss in exchange for a higher chance at a win in several other weeks isn’t an awful trade.

Fantasy Football Draft Domination Strategy for Dummies

It’s that wonderfully demanding time of the year once again where football fans are viscously typing away searching for any piece of details for an edge in fantasy football. Whether it’s information on a certain player or player rankings, you can never do sufficient study. Each year is a learning experience, you learn how you like to prepare, gamers you want, gamers you do not desire, and trades. After lots of years of terrific drafts with failed seasons due to injuries and bad trades, I’m right here to offer a little guidance so at the end of the season you are the one boasting all next off-season about your victorious champion.

QB Advice – Wait. Simply wait. I know how tough it is to miss Drew Brees in the third round, however it’s not worth it. It’s prematurely to draft a quarterback, in the early round you need to stock up on the skill positions (RB & WR) since they go quickly. In a lot of mocks drafts and draft boards quarterbacks, you can draft a player like Matthew Stafford in the late 5th to early 6th round. Stafford is no Drew Brees, do not get my words confused, however he is a great fantasy quarterback. The Lions offense is a very pass heavy attack and they have the very best pass receiver in the league, Calvin Johnson. Stafford tosses lots of goals and usually has numerous goal games.

RB Advice – The exact reverse of preparing quarterbacks, early and commonly. There are just 32 starting running backs in the league and only a handful are actually valuable in fantasy football. If you have an early choice in the draft, it’s a no brainer to obtain a Jamal Charles, Lesean McCoy, or Adrian Peterson. If you have a late choice, fear not. There are some quality selects like Marshawn Lynch, Montee Ball, or Matt Forte, all late 1st round to mid 2nd round quality picks. The other huge advice is try to find the backs that are “injury vulnerable.” It seems every season CJ Spiller, Arian Foster, and Reggie Bush all fight injuries each season and their back ups are normally quality flex to 2nd string running backs.

WR Advice – Wide receivers are tough in fantasy football, there’s a small handful of receivers worth a first round pick like Demaryius Thomas or Calvin Johnson, however aside from them I wouldn’t squander a first tease them. Start trying to find receivers mid-second round to the end of the third round. There’s rather a bit of talent through those rounds with AJ Green, Brandon Marshall, or Jordy Nelson. My recommendation is to draft more receivers than you believe you need. Receivers go through cold and hot streaks and it’s good to have a backup strategy while among your leading receivers are a little cold or off his game.

TE Advice – Tight ends are influencing fantasy football more and more each season. Teams are using them because they are becoming so athletic and makes them a mismatch with the majority of protective players on the field. Mid 3rd round is actually when I ‘d search for a tight end if there isn’t really a receiver you are truly insane about. There’s about 5 tight ends that are going to be consistently great all season and clearly the huge 2 are Rob Gronkowski and Jimmy Graham. If you can’t get them, look at the Brown’s tight end Jordon Cameron. Last season he really became a big part of the Browns offense and was acquiring touchdowns each video game.

Flex Advice – Consistency is truly all you are trying to find from this position. Some leagues do not have fun with a flex, however if you do attempt to find a running back or a receiver. The benefit to drafting them is you can still play them at one of the lots of WR slots or RB slots together with the flex. Some excellent flex players could be Jordy Nelson, Toby Gerhart, or T.Y. Hilton.

K/Defense Advice – Just don’t lose your choices till it’s the last couple of rounds. In the later rounds you can find some gems hidden and it’s worth the threat in some cases to discover a breakout player in round 11. Wait up until the last 3 rounds to compose either position and simply prepare the greatest available.